Category Archives: Home to Roost / Police State

That Which Divides Us

That we are a divided people is not breaking news.

Our divisions are reflected back to us every day. We are consistently presented with the forced-choice of our social, political and religious identities. One belongs to a particular social class and not others. One is either a “conservative” or a “liberal”. One is a “Christian” or a “Jew” or a “Muslim” or a “Hindu” or a “Buddhist” or some other religious label. These are just a few of the ways we identify ourselves. Somehow it became very important to label ourselves and each other. Perhaps this helps us stay with the illusion of “knowing” who we are.

There is another form of division that transcends the “usual suspects” of the various labels already described. This is the division between the opposing agendas of materialism and spirituality. One of the central features of these differing agendas is the question of whether or not violence is deemed acceptable as a means of solving problems. This question also correlates with the contrasting views of separation and connection. Materialism emphasizes the separateness between each of us while realistic spirituality focuses on the connections we share with each other and our world.

The materialistic perspective attributes the highest priority to creating, selling and acquiring Things. This view asserts that the centrality of Things is what life is really all about. In this framework, people are a means to an end. This is sometimes known as “productivity”. If one is “productive” in the proper way then one is recognized as a valuable person. One is considered an “asset”.

The spiritual perspective embraces a very different orientation. It holds to the belief that it is not things that have significant value but rather it is Love and Life itself that is truly valuable. People are to be loved and things are to be used. This perspective is grounded in the belief that all life is inter-connected and inter-related rather than separate and in a state of competition.

This division becomes most apparent in terms of those who are willing to use violence to get what they want and those who refuse to resort to violence to achieve their goals. When a person, when life itself, is seen as a means to an end it becomes acceptable, even laudable, to control, exploit or destroy if that’s what it takes to reach a goal. Domination and destruction are contradictory to the goals of healthy spirituality.
When life is considered sacred it can no longer be objectified as simply a means to an end but instead is known and related to as part of the infinite manifestation of Love.

We can belong to the World of Things or the World of Love. We cannot avoid this choice.

Why focus on the contrast between violence and nonviolence? This framing points to the question of how human problems are to be solved. It is the desire to solve our problems that unites us while it is the methods for achieving those solutions that causes us to diverge into the contrasting problem-solving forms of violence (materialistic power) and nonviolence (spiritual power).

The exercising of Materialistic Power essentially says: “Comply or die.” This “death” may be quite literal or it may be metaphorical in terms of deprivation of needed resources or basic freedoms. It is the straightforward imposing of physical force or intimidation on a person or group to induce their obedience.

The exercising of Spiritual Power, on the other hand, presents a perplexing set of refusals and active responses. When operating from a sense Spiritual Power a person refuses to “fight fire with fire” with the oppressor, refuses to run away from threatened harm, refuses to disengage from the oppressor and refuses to comply with the oppression process. Essentially a person acting from this orientation says: “I won’t fight with you on your level. I won’t run away from you. I won’t end my relationship with you and I won’t obey your unethical manipulations.” The active response is at least as perplexing. While under siege from the oppression of Materialistic Power the active response from one grounded in Spiritual Power is an unwavering “I love you.”

Violence exists as a broad spectrum of attitudes and actions. Its trademark is in its seeking to dominate and diminish the Other who is always regarded as quite separate from the perpetrator of the violence. It seeks victory by destroying or controlling the Other who is defined as a threat of some sort. Its manifestation may take the form of a physical attack with weapons designed to amplify the intended destructive power of the attacker. It may also take the form of a more subtle, non-physical attack (e.g. character assassination) that can nevertheless produce devastating results.

Violence as a process can also be understood as a projection of a person’s pain and/or fear. If one has not dealt constructively with these experiences the temptation to disown them becomes very powerful: “I will hurt you so that you will have to deal with my pain and I won’t. It will become your pain. I will scare you so that you will have to deal with my fear and I won’t. It will become your fear.”

There are those who believe in the use of violence as the method of choice to solve a broad range of human problems. If the end result is sufficiently valued then the means are considered justified. Counted among these believers are women and men, young people and old people, the wealthy and the not-so-wealthy, liberals and conservatives and the full spectrum of religious labels. Those who accept this kind of problem-solving are represented across a wide range of ethnic, social and economic backgrounds. There are law-makers and law-breakers, from the local level to the international stage, who subscribe to the idea that the end justifies the means and that this is how problems get solved.

There are also people from all of the groups just named who completely reject the notion that violence is an acceptable method for solving human problems. They maintain that the means to the desired end cannot be contrary in nature of that end: War cannot create Peace, Oppression cannot create Freedom, Hatred cannot create Love. This group holds that the Means and the End are inseparable.

Nonviolence can be best understood as the active expression and demonstration of love and not as the mere absence of destructive attitudes and actions. When we speak of love it is easy to go off on some wild goose chase as to what this really means. The love conveyed in active nonviolence is a kind of sacrificial love. This is the kind of love that consciously chooses to accept and endure real suffering for the sake of another, specifically for the sake of healing the perpetrator. This kind of love does not define the perpetrator as the “enemy” who must be destroyed or defeated. Instead, Sacrificial Love seeks to help the perpetrator become aware of the truth of his or her real inter-relatedness to the person or people he or she is hurting. In traditional language, it is the deep truth that we are all brothers and sisters to each other.

No less an intellect than Albert Einstein stated: “We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.”

If we give credence to Einstein’s claim about the nature of problem-solving it becomes logically impossible to believe that the problem of violence, whether this is a problem between nations, between individuals or within ourselves, can be solved through violent methods. The time has come to free ourselves from the mental prison that holds us in the insane belief that declares: “We have to kill people who kill people to show them that killing people is wrong.”

It becomes necessary to change our way of thinking and understanding in order to solve our problems. It is necessary to shift our awareness and our perspective in order to successfully solve our problems. We cannot solve our problems with the same low-level thinking that got us into trouble in the first place. If our house is burning down we cannot save it with a flame-thrower!

The problem of violence within ourselves is a crucial one. As previously stated, if one does not successfully heal his or her inner violence and the injuries from it then one will be very likely to project this destructiveness onto someone else. It is necessary to establish this internal healing as the foundation to solving human problems on an interpersonal level as well as between various social groups.

No less a wisdom teacher than Jesus of Nazareth explained metaphorically that one must first take the wooden beam out of one’s own eye before attempting to remove the splinter out of another’s eye. (Luke 7:5)

If we are to take him at his word, this means that we need to start healing our own impairment and suffering in order to stop perpetuating violence against ourselves which is often invisible to the rest of the world but the individual (who, in this case, is both perpetrator and victim) is acutely aware of his or her own internal self-torture process (e.g. “I’m such an idiot!”, “I’ll never be good enough!”, “No one would want to be with me if they knew what I was really like.”, etc.). We need to attend to our own healing and make peace within ourselves before we start telling, coercing and demanding that the other person (or group or nation) act a certain way to put their house in order.

What divides us is a faulty perception of how separate we are from each other. This misperception supports the belief in the “win-lose” form of problem-solving in our lives. When all we see is our disconnectedness is becomes easy to assume that competition in the only way to achieve needed solutions.

We move from division to unity when we start to see that the truth of our existence is one of connection and belonging. What were once seen as major differences between one another can now be recognized as largely superficial. We begin to love more and more inclusively as we realize that any injuries we do to others we do to our selves and that the compassion we extend to others is also the compassion that we receive.

Dark Times Since a Dark Day

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The 9/11 Memorial features exactly one piece of art that questions the official conspiracy theory about that day. Here is an interview with artist Anthony Padua, and some of his artwork shown above.

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Heartwarming!

We try to stay away from sarcasm here at CAM, but this article that someone shared on Facebook really struck me. They say a culture’s humor is a window to its soul. Or something like that…

Heartwarming! This Cop Cares So Much For The People In His Town That He Doesn’t Kill Them!

“Mike Dirosa is just more proof that, every now and then, it’s good to hear about people doing nice things for no reason at all. What about you? Do you kill people you see in your city or town? Why or why not? Let us know in the comments!”

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source: clickhole.com

Urban $hield, Homeland $ecurity

Don’t miss this one by Mother Jones: The Making of the Warrior Cop.

“From inside the hall, cops watched warily as the demonstrators chanted slogans about Ferguson. “If I see someone with an upside-down flag, I’m going to punch him in the face,” one said to his team. Nearby, a vendor sold shirts with slogans of his own. One bore the image of a Spartan helmet and the phrase ‘Destruction cometh; and they shall seek peace, and there shall be none.’ His most popular shirt read ‘This Is My Peace Sign’; it showed crosshairs centered on what I briefly took to be a person with his hands up, though it was actually an AR-15 sight.”

And the militarization of America continues in the name of the national $ecurity $tate. Business is booming.

Die! Die! Die!

Another SWAT video with some lovely music and featuring the fictional character The Punisher. This one from Doraville, Georgia. The wars, and the people we’ve trained to fight them, are coming home. The trained killers are really excited about their new toys provided to local police departments by the Pentagon, from the surpluses of the military-industrial complex, as shown in this video. Just a matter of time before they get to “protect” us all right here at home.

Mike Lofgren on The Deep State

As a former Congressional staff member with top secret security clearance, Mike Lofgren crunched the numbers for 28 years as part of the House and Senate Budget Committees and found that the numbers didn’t add up. The numbers led him to connect the dots to America’s “deep state”: where elected and unelected figures collude to protect and serve powerful vested interests. He left the Republican party and wrote The Party Is Over.

Now he has written an essay called The Anatomy of the Deep State. It is a must-read.

An interview with Bill Moyers is below. “He says: I’m not a conspiracy theorist…This is something that hides in plain sight. It’s something we know about but we can’t connect the dots, or most people can’t.”

He talks about a hybrid of corporate America and the national security state. He also talks about Group Think, “a kind of assimilation of the views of your superiors and peers,” a all out plague in Washington.

Moyers: “If the ideology of the deep state is not right or left, Democrat or Republican, what is it?”

Lofgren: “It’s an ideology. I just don’t think we’ve named it. It’s kind of corporatism. Now the actors in this drama tend to steer clear of social issues. They pretend to be merely neutral servants of the State giving the best advice possible on national security or financial matters, but they hold a very deep ideology of the Washington consensus at home, which is deregulation, outsourcing, de-industrialization and financialization and they believe in American exceptionalism abroad, which is: boots on the ground everywhere, it’s our right to meddle everywhere in the world, and the result of that is perpetual war.

He does end on a hopeful note:

6 “Peace Officers” Gang-Murder 1 Man

 Kelly Thomas, R.I.P.

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I don’t know which says more about the state of our society: the fact that this horrific killing happened or the fact that a jury acquitted the killers, presumably because they were wearing uniforms and just “doing what they were trained to do.” This comment by a random person at the Fullerton Rag sums it up:

Police have rights that normal citizens do not. The news mentioned that they were in line with their training. As a Marine and veteran of Iraq, I know what my training did, but it was “all right” because it was within my Rules of Engagement to kill. When the difference between what is legal and what is right, allows for death of someone that does not deserve it, something needs to change. Usually this means the people that created that difference are punished. Since this did not happen, we ought to look higher. This “training” that allowed someone to die, in the way Thomas did, is horrible and wrong and should change. I am curious and hopeful the FBI investigation proves fruitful.

Here is a great analysis at The Atlantic about the shock and confusion over the verdict. But should we be so shocked? This is what happens in a police state! The Rules of Engagement change! This is happening because the mindset and mentality of militarism, which we project abroad, is coming home to roost. See: Do we live in a police state?

This is a beautiful song and a well done video. Pray for the victim and his tormentors. I can’t find much background on the homeless victim Kelly Thomas, but reports say he was a veteran of the war in Iraq.

Pray for Kelly Thomas, his family, and his murderers.

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The following photo of a 37-year-old schizophrenic homeless man named Kelly Thomas was taken in the hospital by his father Ron Thomas, a former Orange County Sheriff’s Deputy. Thomas was fatally beaten by Fullerton Police officers on July 5, 2011 following attempts to search his backpack due to reports of someone “looking into cars” in the area.

Adrenaline Junkies

The story of Gabriel Brown, former decorated soldier turned Blackwater employee turned armed robber, is sad indeed. He blamed his military “service” (he killed people whom he believed posed no real threat to him because he was ordered to) on his downward spiral in life, leading to drug use, adultery, gambling, debt, an addiction to adrenaline, and a feeling of shame, of being lost and feeling suicidal.

Hillsborough County (Fla.) Sheriff’s Office

Hillsborough County (Fla.) Sheriff’s Office

The Tampa Florida Tribune reports: “I was ordered to kill the man even though to me it seemed as if he was just ordinary guy coming out of his house. It was a difficult moment in my career as a sniper because in my opinion he was not a threat. It is not easy to kill people, and if you have to kill someone who you suspect is innocent just because you are ordered to do so, it is even worse. I still have nightmares about the man that I killed.”

Why do Christians keep lauding this kind of “service” that does not produce the fruit of the Spirit but it’s exact opposite? If a form of service does not produce the fruit of the Spirit, how can we say that the one being served is God? Who, or what, are these soldiers really serving?

Galatians 5:13-23: “Now the works of the flesh are obvious: immorality, impurity, licentiousness, idolatry, sorcery, hatreds, rivalry, jealousy, outbursts of fury, acts of selfishness, dissensions, factions, occasions of envy, drinking bouts, orgies, and the like. I warn you, as I warned you before, that those who do such things will not inherit the kingdom of God. In contrast, the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control.

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